nav-left cat-right
cat-right

Adding A Wood Stove To Your Homestead

Wood burning stove in homesteadWell, with October half over and Halloween approaching, the night are certainly getting much cooler here in Colorado.

Winter is just around the corner, and if you’re in the market for a wood or pellet stove, this is a good time to buy one and have it installed in your home.

In the previous blog post we talked about cast iron radiators, but many homesteads in the country aren’t set up for hot water heat, and a good quality wood stove is the best option.

Some folks who do have central heating still buy a wood stove to supplement the heating in their homes, especially in the rooms where the family spends the most time, like in the livingroom or kitchen.

And in fact if the temperature is above freezing outside, often a wood or pellet stove is all you need to keep the entire house warm enough to live in, and much cheaper to operate than a central heating system.

Things to consider when purchasing a wood stove.

There are a wide variety of choices available in stoves, and not just wood or pellet burning models either. There are a number corn burning stoves on the market today, and oil burning models as well. Each has it’s pros and cons, depending on the type of fuel that works best for you, the efficiency of the stove, emissions, how it is constructed, heat output, safety, and of course your budget.

One consideration is whether to buy a cast iron or welded steel stove. The cast iron models are more attractive than welded models, but they cost more, and after a few years they need to be rebuild to seal the joints between the steel panels to keep them from leaking.

Stove efficiency is another important consideration. The newer, certified stoves tend to be more energy efficient than the older models, as combustion technology has improved. Just as newer cars are more efficient at using gasoline, newer wood burning stoves are about one-third more efficient than the older pot belly or box style stoves. This might not sound like much, but consider the fact that you’ll only have to cut and haul two-thirds the amount of wood, and you’ll spend one-third the money if you buy your firewood. Plus efficiency also translates into less emissions, which makes these newer stove better for the environment as well.

If you would like to read a more detailed buyers guide for buying wood or pellet stoves you can visit the site below.

Wood Heat.org website

 

Leave a Reply